Win Over $150 worth of RED by Modibodi underwear

Win Over $150 worth of RED by Modibodi underwear

WIN over $150 worth of Modibodi RED!

RED is fashionable, sustainable, hi-tech, super comfortable underwear that totally replaces the need for disposable hygiene. It's designed to become the best friend of teens starting their period, so you can go with the flow, your way!

 

Between the ages of 8 and 14, confidence levels for girls drop by 30%. And according to research from RED by Modibodi, that is the age that 82% of young girls have their first period.

 

Research by Ypulse showed that girls are 18% less likely than boys to call themselves 'confident', instead opting for words such as 'depressed', 'ugly' or 'anxious'; which can cause lasting effects on self-confidence.

 

As the mother of four children, Modibodi's founder and CEO Kristy Chong knows the importance of raising strong young women, and developed RED by Modibodi to support young girls on their journey through adolescence. 

 

"RED by Modibodi has always been an advocate for developing strong, confident young women who can take on the world, no matter what time of the month. RED believes that no girl should every feel limited by her period and should never stop doing what they love, like sport, swimming, dance or hanging out with friends.

 

"In fact, 68% of RED by Modibodi customers say that their period undies give them the confidence to participate in activities they'd normally feel uncomfortable doing on their period," says Kristy Chong. 

 

RED has partnered with Girl Shaped Flames to work encourage young girls (and their parents) and help boost their confidence and self-esteem. Girl Shaped Flames is an online resource platform supporting young girls and their parents to raise strong, confident women. Their founder, Tanya Meessmann is a youth mentor and understands the importance of building a strong foundation of self-confidence in their early teen years, especially when puberty, hormones and periods start impacting how they see themselves!

 

Here are Tanya's three tips for raising resilient, confidence young girls. 

 

  1. Give your daughter the opportunity to fail

The YPulse survey suggests that between are 3 in 4 girls worry about failing, not only in school but in other areas of life. Tanya's advice to parents is that allowing your child the opportunity to make mistakes will increase their confidence and resilience moving forward.

 

"As young women develop, their neurological pathways to decision making and resilience are created by the experiences they have. If they are not given the opportunity to fail or always save them when they do, it becomes extremely difficult to build those pathways later in life," says Tanya.

 

  1. Get her out of her comfort zone

Often, girls will fight back on trying something new for fear of looking foolish, but in doing so, they aren't able to develop the confidence to pursue their goals and ambitions that might seem too far out of reach.

 

"Every girl has a 'line of perceived ability'; that is, the line that tells them when to say, 'I can't do this'. That line can only be stretched with experience; they need to challenge themselves to move away from the familiar before they can stop saying 'I can't' and start saying 'I can'," says Tanya.

 

  1. Communicate, but don't micromanage

Parents will always play a role in the way a young woman develops, but it's important to establish boundaries as she develops into her teen years.

 

"Develop a healthy relationship based on trust, openness and approachability, while allowing her to have experiences at her own pace. She needs to know that she can call upon you when you need reassurance and support, without feeling that you are trying to micromanage her," says Tanya.

QUESTIONS

Q1

*What size would you like? (please check against modibodi sizing guide)

 
 

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