You are at: > Health & Lifestyle

James Nevile Work Out In Winter As An Asthmatic Interview

James Nevile Work Out In Winter As An Asthmatic Interview

Working out in winter can be a struggle. When the sun's sleeping-in and going home before you, it can be easy to lose motivation – especially if you are among the one in six Australians who suffer from asthma, which can really make itself known in the colder weather.

In fact, four-fifths (84%) of asthma sufferers say that their symptoms worsen during the cold, flu and allergy seasons. However don't give up on working out all-together - just learn to exercise smarter, says Amcal Senior Pharmacist, James Nevile.

Here are James' top tips for working out with asthma in winter:

Know your triggers – Whether it's cold air, exercise, or pollens, know what triggers your asthma and adjust your activity accordingly.* It is recommended to ensure you perform appropriate warm up exercises and exercise indoors when the pollen count is high.

If you don't yet know what sets you off, keep an asthma journal where you can document times of the day that this worsens. You can then chat this through with your pharmacist or GP. Before changing your exercise plan, speak to your doctor to be sure you have an up to date asthma action plan and take your asthma medicines according to your action plan.

Be pragmatic – If you know you're going to work out that day, be sure to use both your preventer medicine and reliever medicine as per your asthma action plan. You don't have to stop doing what you love, but if it's a particularly cold and windy day, try to complete an indoor work-out instead of exercising outdoors.

Asthma control can vary with seasons – For some people living with asthma, their symptoms may worsen as a result of the weather. If you're having trouble breathing, it might be a sign that you need to go speak to your pharmacist who may refer you to a doctor. Many people find that when they are feeling run down with a cold or flu, they'll experience asthma-like respiratory issues. Even if you've never had asthma before, go get it checked out to be safe.

Mix up your routine – During strenuous activity, we tend to breathe through our mouths – allowing the cool, dry air directly into out lungs causing shortness of breath, coughing and decreased performance. While you don't have to hang up your running shoes, you could alternate your work-out schedule with activities such as swimming are also great for fitness but less likely to trigger respiratory issues.

Know when to take it easy – No, you can't sweat out that cold & flu as much as you might want to – sometimes you just have to take a day off. When you're struck down with a virus, the best thing for recovery is rest. Don't be too hard on yourself if you have some time off exercise to get better. If you keep the fluids up and get ample sleep, you'll be back to your full energy levels much faster than if you try to push through!

For more information on asthma symptoms, triggers and treatment options visit: www.amcal.com.au/respiratory

 

Diabetes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io-zZaEHvOQ

Heart Health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOH9e_QitaI

Kidney Health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcC4QufvLv4

Respiratory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqUi7QZRPYA

Coeliac Disease: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpipTyfAF38

 

 

Interview with Amcal Senior Pharmacist, James Nevile

Question: What should we be aware of when exercising in winter?

James Nevile: Working out in winter can be a struggle. When the sun's sleeping-in and going home before you, it can be easy to lose motivation – especially if you are among the one in six Australians who suffer from asthma, which can really make itself known in the colder weather.

In fact, four-fifths (84%) of asthma sufferers say that their symptoms worsen during the cold, flu and allergy seasons according to research recently conducted by Amcal.


Question: How do we need to prepare our body differently when exercising in winter?

James Nevile: Whether it's cold air, exercise, or pollens, know what triggers your asthma and adjust your activity accordingly. It is recommended to ensure you perform appropriate warm up exercises and exercise indoors when the pollen count is high.

If you don't yet know what sets you off, keep an asthma journal where you can document times of the day that this worsens. You can then chat this through with your pharmacist or GP. Before changing your exercise plan, speak to your doctor to be sure you have an up to date asthma action plan and take your asthma medicines according to your action plan.


Question: What do asthmatics need to be aware of when exercising in winter?

James Nevile: During strenuous activity, we tend to breathe through our mouths – allowing the cool, dry air directly into out lungs causing shortness of breath, coughing and decreased performance. While you don't have to hang up your running shoes, you could alternate your work-out schedule with activities such as swimming are also great for fitness but less likely to trigger respiratory issues.


Question: What are the top triggers for asthmatics?

James Nevile: For some people living with asthma, their symptoms may worsen as a result of the weather – this can be due to cold air, exercise or pollens. If you're having trouble breathing, it might be a sign that you need to go speak to your pharmacist who may refer you to a doctor. Many people find that when they are feeling run down with a cold or flu, they'll experience asthma-like respiratory issues. Even if you've never had asthma before, go get it checked out to be safe.


Question: Can asthmatics take part in intense exercise?

James Nevile: Yes, but be pragmatic. If you know you're going to work out that day, be sure to use both your preventer medicine and reliever medicine as per your asthma action plan. You don't have to stop doing what you love, but if it's a particularly cold and windy day, try to complete an indoor work-out instead of exercising outdoors.


Question: What should friends and family be aware of when exercising with someone who is an asthmatic?

James Nevile: Coughing occurring at night or in the early hours of the morning
Wheezing
Breathing problems such as shortness of breath or chest tightness.

If you do notice any of these symptoms, be sure to go to the GP. Asthma can be well controlled in most cases, so seeing a healthcare professional such as your GP is important.


Question: Is sweating out the flu myth?

James Nevile: Yes, it is a myth. You can't sweat out that cold & flu as much as you might want to – sometimes you just have to take a day off. When you're struck down with a virus, the best thing for recovery is rest.


Question: What should we do, exercise wise, if we are unwell?

James Nevile: Don't be too hard on yourself if you have some time off exercise to get better. If you keep the fluids up and get ample sleep, you'll be back to your full energy levels much faster than if you try to push through!

For more information on asthma symptoms, triggers and treatment options visit: www.amcal.com.au/respiratory


Interview by Brooke Hunter



 

 
 



Top
 
Join our VIP Club
Enter Competitions
Add to Bookmarks
Free Toolbar Download
VIP member - Login