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Rhys Nicholson Millennials Demystified Interview

Millennials? More like Simplennials

New experiment shows young Aussies rate selfless acts over selfies

 

Lazy, selfish and entitled. These are some of the terms used to commonly describe the nation's 18–30-year-olds, until now.

 

Mastercard has challenged the stigma associated with millennials with a first of its kind experiment to prove they are more likely to opt for social good over social media greed.

 

The Millennials Demystified experiment undertaken by staff at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) asked participants to choose between one of two responses, using neuroscience to highlight the gap between society's perception of this misunderstood generation and the reality. The findings helped determine what they really wanted for a new rewards program.

 

"We set out to better understand what millennials are really thinking as opposed to what they thought we wanted to hear. What our investigation showed was that this group responded with high levels of emotion to questions that had a positive societal impact, suggesting that millennials are much more selfless and straightforward than their stereotype suggests," said Dr Jacqueline Rushby, research fellow at UNSW.

 

The research, conducted using a high-tech, 16-point contact electroencephalography headset, monitored participants' brainwave activity and physical reactions, like eye movements, to find out what they really thought. It suggested that millennials:

 

Prefer a cuppa and chat with Mum over food fads such as a blue algae latte 

Were more likely to give food to someone in need than scoff down another avo on toast 

Would prefer to raise a million dollars for charity than have a million social media followers 

Want to make a positive change for the planet over travelling the world for free in a year 

Would forgo social media fame for self-confidence 

Volunteer at a soup kitchen over boasting about their #foodporn moments 

Want to do more selfless acts rather than take more selfies

 

"As a participant in the experiment, there were certainly some 'duh' moments, but I guess that's the point. Other generations think we're living this insane, self-obsessed, phone coddling life but, really, we're not," millennial comedian and experiment participant, Rhys Nicholson said.

 

"We want Australia to know that we're actually pretty alright. We're a whole bunch simpler than you think."

 

Commenting on the new rewards program, Sarah Pike, Vice President, Marketing Australasia said, "Young Aussies are looking for ways to make positive changes in the world and connect with the people they care about. We've developed benefits with this in mind, providing discounts for travel, two-for-one entertainment offers and hospitality upgrades."

 

Rhys continued, "I have absolutely no interest in what a blue algae latte is, but I'd definitely be up for bonuses like chips with my burger to share with my friends. Come to think of it, if I had an algae latte I'd imagine I wouldn't have any friends."

 

For more information about Mastercard Debit Rewards and view the video of the Millennials Demystified experiment, visit http://debit.mastercard.com.au/

 

Interview with Rhys Nicholson

Question: What did the experiment conducted by The University of New South Wales recently find?

Rhys Nicholson: The experiment conducted by the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Mastercard showed that Millennials are just like everyone else. They want what we all want, genuine connections, to make a difference in the world, and want every day, simple pleasures.

The key results from the experiment showed that millennials:

Prefer a cuppa and chat with Mum over food fads such as a blue algae latte
Were more likely to give food to someone in need than scoff down another avo on toast
Would prefer to raise a million dollars for charity than have a million social media followers
Want to make a positive change for the planet over travelling the world for free in a year
Would forgo social media fame for self-confidence
Volunteer at a soup kitchen over boasting about their #foodporn moments
Want to do more selfless acts rather than take more selfies


Question: What surprised you most about these results?

Rhys Nicholson: Well it was less surprising but great to know that young Aussies aren't lazy, entitled etc, we are not these exotic birds that everyone seems to make out that we are. We are looking for ways to make positive changes in the world and connect with the people they care about.


Question: Why did you decide to take part in the Millennials Demystified experiment?

Rhys Nicholson: Mastercard wanted to take the time to actually ask millennials how they really feel and what they really think, bridging the gap between what society assumes we are (which a big group of smartphone wielding zombies) and the truth.


Question: What was involved in the Millennials Demystified experiment?

Rhys Nicholson: Millennials Demystified is an experiment conducted by Mastercard in partnership with UNSW. People are obsessed with talking about my generation and more often than not we get mislabeled and are misunderstood. The experiment highlights the gap between what people think they know about us millennials and the truth.


Question: What do you prefer over a blue algae latte or any food fad?

Rhys Nicholson: I mean, I guess anything? I can never be bothered with that type of stuff. I like food to be a nice middle ground between tasting delicious, looking good and not clogging my arteries. No algae please. Algae is for ponds, not Rhys.


Question: Why do you think millennials are perceived as wanting outrageous Christmas gifts?

Rhys Nicholson: Because it's what always happens. I reckon throughout history the older generations always make up some crazy thing about the younger ones being out of control and like over the top, stupid things. Isn't it the baby boomers who were the dangerous hippies that were going to ruin the world? Did they? I bet there were single cell amoebas telling slightly more evolved single cell amoebas to slow down. I bet I'll tell my kids they don't understand what it was like back in the day too *sigh*


Question: What Christmas gifts are on your wish list?

Rhys Nicholson: Some time off. That's truly all I want. I am pretty busy a lot of the time and do loads of travel. By the end of the year I am always pretty sick of planes and hotels so this Christmas all I ask is a couple weeks off to spend with my friends and some of my family to do dumb things like go to the movies or have naps. Oh I've missed naps.

Ergh I just realised how gross and tacky that sounds. But it's true.


Question: What selfless acts will you be participating in, in 2018, instead of taking selfies?

Rhys Nicholson: I'll be honest, you probably won't see me doing the midnight shift at a soup kitchen. But I was speaking to my fiancé the other day and we were saying we want to do more next year. Be a part of things. Whether it be giving to charities of attending more rallies. I think my generation is always thought of being kind of ill-informed or political and I would like to be a part of changing that. This answer definitely wasn't funny. Maybe imagine I'm tap dancing as I say it. Is that funny? Yeah that's better isn't it.


Interview by Brooke Hunter



 

 
 



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